Guests of Community Pulse

Kim Bannerman

Kim Bannerman

Over a decade in Technology. Passionate about making Open Source and Community better tomorrow than it was today and helping people grow. Always focused on the customer. Interests: emerging technology, science fiction & fantasy, college football, traveling

Lorna Jane Mitchell

Lorna Jane Mitchell

Lorna is based in Yorkshire; she is a Developer Advocate with Nexmo as well as a published author and experienced conference speaker. She brings her technical expertise on a range of topics to audiences all over the world with her writing and speaking engagements, always delivered with a very practical slant. In her spare time, Lorna blogs at http://lornajane.net.

Mary Thengvall

Mary Thengvall

Mary Thengvall is a connector of people at heart, both personally and professionally. She loves digging into the strategy of how to build and foster communities, and has been working with various developer communities for over 10 years. After several years of building community programs at O’Reilly Media, Chef Software, and SparkPost, she’s now consulting for companies looking to build out a Developer Relations strategy. She’s also the author of the first book on Developer Relations: The Business Value of Developer Relations (© 2018, Apress)

Matt Asay

Matt Asay

Matt Asay is Head of Developer Ecosystem for Adobe, where previously he was vice president of mobile strategy. Prior to Adobe, Asay held a range of roles at open source companies: VP of business development, marketing and community at MongoDB, a leading big data database company; VP of business development at real-time analytics company Nodeable (acquired by Appcelerator); VP of business development and interim CEO at mobile HTML5 start-up Strobe (acquired by Facebook); COO at Canonical, a leading Linux and cloud vendor; and head of the Americas at Alfresco, a content management startup. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and holds a J.D. from Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues. Asay writes regular columns for The Register, TechRepublic, and InfoWorld.

Matthew Broberg

Matthew Broberg

Matt is VP of Community for Sensu Inc focused on the incredible community around Sensu, the open source monitoring framework. He contributes to infrastructure communities with a focus on open collaboration, especially through GitHub. Matt has spoken at many conference (OSCON, VMworld, Velocity), on podcasts (Cloudcast, Speaking in Tech, The Hot Aisle) and co-created the Geek Whisperers podcast. Matt is on the board of the Influence Marketing Council, co-maintains the Evangelist Collective, contributes to the Go Community Outreach Working Group, occasionally blogs on Medium.com and shares code on GitHub. He’s also a fan of tattoos, rock climbing and cats, though remains unsure of Schrödinger’s.

Maureen McElaney

Maureen McElaney

Maureen McElaney is a Developer Advocate at IBM Center of Open Source Data and Ai Technologies and enjoys broadening IBM’s understanding and involvement in open source communities. Prior to joining the team, she worked as a QA Engineer at Dealer.com and is passionate about building tools that increase developer productivity and joy. She is an experienced community builder and is passionate about increasing diversity in tech.

Megan Groves

Megan Groves

Founder of InterimCMO, marketing @IgniteTalks, startup advisor & mentor at Highway1 and TechStars, latin dancer, polyglot.

Nathen Harvey

Nathen Harvey

Nathen Harvey, Cloud Developer Advocate at Google, helps the community understand and apply DevOps and SRE principles and practices in the cloud to drive business outcomes. He is a co-host of the Food Fight Show, a podcast about Chef and DevOps.

PJ Hagerty

PJ Hagerty

Developer, writer, speaker, musician, and Founder of DevRelate.io, PJ is known to travel the world speaking about programming and the way people think and interact. Traveling to conferences and meet ups around the world, PJ likes to spread the word on the importance of community and coding, stressing the importance of outreach and focusing on the human side of being a coder. He is also known for wearing hats.