Technical or Tech Savvy? What's Actually Required to Be a Developer Relations Professional?

Posted on Tuesday, Mar 26, 2019
As Developer Relations becomes more mainstream, the understanding of what makes someone qualified to be a Developer Relations professional is getting cloudy. Do you have to have a technical background? And if so, does that mean that you’ve held a “Software Engineer” title? Or simply that you’ve taken the time to understand the technical pieces of your product? Jason, Mary, and PJ are joined by Karissa Peth, Sr. Developer Relations Program Manager at Microsoft, and Matty Stratton, DevOps Advocate at PagerDuty, as they dig into the nuance of the various Developer Relations career paths.

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Guests

Karissa Peth

Karissa Peth

Karissa is a Sr. Developer Relations Program Manager at Microsoft and previously spent time building community at Bugsnag & New Relic. She loves Go + Python and has too many IOT side projects started. Prior to her transition into the magical work of developer relations she was a cancer researcher for 9 years. Due to her work in bio science she is prone to asking about sample sizes and standard error when presented graphs, and assumes discussions of funnels are not about marketing. She spends her weekends racing on sailboats and also enjoys sewing clothes.

Matty Stratton

Matty Stratton

Matt Stratton is a HumanOps Advocate at PagerDuty, where he helps dev and ops teams advance the practice of their craft and become more operationally mature. He collaborates with PagerDuty customers and industry thought leaders in the broader DevOps community, and back when he drove, his license plate actually said “DevOps”.

Matty has over 20 years experience in IT operations, ranging from large financial institutions such as JPMorganChase and internet firms, including Apartments.com. He is a sought-after speaker internationally, presenting at Agile, DevOps, and ITSM focused events, including ChefConf, DevOpsDays, Interop, PINK, and others worldwide. Matty is the founder and co-host of the popular Arrested DevOps podcast, as well as a global organizer of the DevOpsDays set of conferences.

He lives in San Francisco and has three awesome kids, who he loves just a little bit more than he loves Doctor Who. He is currently on a mission to discover the best pho in the world.

Hosts

Jason Hand

Jason Hand

Senior Cloud Ops Advocate at Microsoft. Jason Hand writes, presents, and coaches on the principles and nuance of DevOps, Site Reliability Engineering, and modern incident management practices. Named “DevOps Evangelist of the Year” by DevOps.com in 2016, Jason recently authored a new book on the topic of Site Reliability Engineering. In addition to SRE, Jason has authored books with O’Reilly Media on the subject of post-incident reviews and Chatops. DevOpsDays Rockies organizer and host of the Front-range Site Reliability Meetup, Jason is dedicated to the latest trends in technology, sharing the lessons learned, and helping people continuously improve their IT and software development practices.

Mary Thengvall

Mary Thengvall

Mary Thengvall is a connector of people at heart, both personally and professionally. She loves digging into the strategy of how to build and foster communities, and has been working with various developer communities for over 10 years. After several years of building community programs at O’Reilly Media, Chef Software, and SparkPost, she’s now consulting for companies looking to build out a Developer Relations strategy. She’s also the author of the first book on Developer Relations: The Business Value of Developer Relations (© 2018, Apress)

PJ Hagerty

PJ Hagerty

Developer, writer, speaker, musician, and Founder of DevRelate.io, PJ is known to travel the world speaking about programming and the way people think and interact. Traveling to conferences and meet ups around the world, PJ likes to spread the word on the importance of community and coding, stressing the importance of outreach and focusing on the human side of being a coder. He is also known for wearing hats.


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